Sunday, October 16, 2016

i learned something from this one

This article explains why some of us get so annoyed when cancer "awareness" campaigns focus on saving the "girls" or the "tatas" or - well you know what I mean.

Lots of food for thought here and I learned some things about cisgender privilege and breast cancer.

From "Every day feminism, It's a longish read but very well done.

"4 Ways Breast Cancer Awareness Campaigns Can Be Sexist and Oppressive"

Saturday, October 15, 2016

time is running out

This is one of the very best and most powerful adds I have seen on breast cancer. And that is saying something.

It's about living with metastatic breast cancer, less than 3 minutes long and very, very worth it.

Friday, October 14, 2016

update: stable

I have now had 17 intrathecal (injected into my brain) treatments of the Herceptin. I'm getting used to it.

I had an brain MRI on September 15.

It showed all visible tumours to be stable. There were no new visible tumours. As I said, in an email to family:
"The brain MRI shows things to be stable. This is so much better than the alternative that we celebrated with gelato and a meal out.

It would have been nice to see some progress but this is still good. What's difficult to know is if I am just staying stable right now on my own or if the treatment is working. What is certain is that we will not be stopping for a little while - even if it is a grind, we have to assume that it's helping. Things are certainly not nearly as bad after 14 treatments as they could be by now."
The oncologist treating me said that it's likely that I am stable because of some treatment but we don't know if that's the Herceptin or the CyberKnife radiation I had in March. I do wish it were more obvious but I am happy to be here and to be feeling OK, all things considered.

I also had a spinal MRI on September 16. The report clearly stated that there was no visible sign of metastasis in my spine. This is good news. I'm still in a lot of pain but I don't need to worry that its caused by a new tumour.
"I have degenerative disc disease (which is a misnomer because it is not a disease and not bound to get worse). I will not hurt it by walking through pain or swimming. I'm going to see a physiotherapist and I have acquired a stability ball. My back pain has been a serious impediment to my quality of life so I want to make it better."
I also have neuropathy in my right foot and a lot of discomfort from headaches and all the weight I have gained. I miss my old body and the things it could do. I haven't given up hope that I will get some of that back but it's frustrating. 

On the other hand, I feel lighter these days. I spent much of the summer feeling like I was about to die and just waiting for the other shoe to drop. Nothing has changed really except that I seem to have decided to enjoy living. It's so much easier to exist this way.

At one of my treatments this summer, Tim said to me "I feel an obligation to have more fun." It's an odd way to put things but I really got it. We have, since that day, put in a concerted effort to have a better time. And I think we've been doing a pretty good job.